Protect Cross River Gorillas from Extinction

Target: Ibrahim Jibrin, Honurable Minister of State for Environment, Nigeria

Goal: Enhance efforts to protect the Cross River gorilla from hunters, provide them safe habitats and facilitate external breeding.

The Cross River gorilla is critically endangered with a population estimated between 200 to 300 individuals and decreasing continuously. These gorillas live in forests away from humans in Nigeria and Cameroon and have become endangered due to a history of hunting and lack of interpopulation among the 11 remaining groups. While hunting the Cross River gorilla is illegal, enforcement is difficult across the 3,000 square miles of rough terrain. Any amount of killing would prove devastating to the survival of the sub-species. Tom Dillon, Senior Vice President of Field Programs for the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) says, “If we don’t get serious about saving these spectacular species, it’s quite likely many won’t be around in the years to come.”

The WWF has partnered with non-governmental agencies , logging companies, the Cameroon Ministry of Forest and Wildlife, and local communities to help ensure the “sustainable management” of the gorilla’s home and protect it from poachers. According to the WWF, there is little known about this sub-species so the foundation has partnered with the governments of Nigeria and Cameroon to support research about the ecology and biology of the animals while they still exist. Sign this petition to encourage greater government support for habitat protection and a greater effort to facilitate breeding between the 11 remaining groups.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Hon. Jibrin,

We thank you for your concern for the Cross River gorilla and for past efforts to support the research of this sub-species. Little is known about these animals and their population continues to decline due to past hunters and inbreeding. These beautiful creatures are nearly extinct with a dwindling population of 200 to 300 individuals scattered across 3,000 square miles of forest, concentrating in 11 groups. There is little chance that these groups will interact with one another, leading to inbreeding and extinction.

While the World Wildlife Foundation and the Wildlife Conservation Society have gained some support from the Nigerian and Cameroon governments for research, it is imperative that more be done to save these animals. It is vital that these gorilla groups have safe cohabitation and breed with one another in order to guarantee the continued existence of this sub-species. We appreciate your attention to the wildlife preservation in your area and request that stricter regulations be placed on logging companies to protect the gorilla habitats, harsh punishment for poaching and safe facilitation of intergroup breeding.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Fiver Locker

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4 Comments

  1. Kathy Khoshfahm says:

    Ibrahim Jibrin – This planet is home to many different types of Life, not just human Life, and all Life should be respected. And like it or not, the fate of the Gorilla population in your country is in your hands. Please use your power and position to do whatever it takes to keep these Gorillas alive and thriving. These Gorillas have just as much a right as we do to live their lives on planet Earth in peace, free from torture and murder at the hands of humans. God bless…

  2. WAITING FOR WHAT ????

    THE NEXT ICE AGE ???

  3. Bev Woodburn says:

    Ibrahim Jibrin, Honurable Minister of State for Environment, Nigeria

    Enhance efforts to protect the Cross River gorilla from hunters, provide them safe habitats and facilitate external breeding.

    The Cross River gorilla is critically endangered with a population estimated between 200 to 300 individuals and decreasing continuously. These gorillas live in forests away from humans in Nigeria and Cameroon and have become endangered due to a history of hunting and lack of interpopulation among the 11 remaining groups. While hunting the Cross River gorilla is illegal, enforcement is difficult across the 3,000 square miles of rough terrain. Any amount of killing would prove devastating to the survival of the sub-species. Tom Dillon, Senior Vice President of Field Programs for the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) says, “If we don’t get serious about saving these spectacular species, it’s quite likely many won’t be around in the years to come.”

  4. Lisa Zarafonetis Lisa Zarafonetis says:

    Signed & shared❗️😢

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