Restore Protections for Wolves

Target: Kate Brown, Governor of Oregon

Goal: Restore endangered species protections to wolves to put an end to recent killings.

Several wolves have been slain from three different packs in Oregon, with two more scheduled to be “removed” in the coming weeks from a pack in the northeast corner of the state. In all of these cases, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has given in to the demands of ranchers who are eager to see the wolves killed in response to livestock losses.

Prior to 2015, wolves in Oregon were listed as a state endangered species, and their numbers had rebounded following near collapse earlier in the 20th century. Thanks to political pressures from the ranching industry, wolves were delisted, and since then the number of wolves has plateaued within the state. If wildlife commissioners have their way, planned killings could put the wolf population below 2015 levels.

What is worse is that these killings are unnecessary and will likely have no impact on preventing livestock losses. Wolf packs splinter following cullings, which may cause them to push into new areas and threaten livestock at different pastures. Furthermore, wolves help support healthy habitats for a wide variety of species through ensuring that large herbivores do not remove too much ground cover.

We cannot allow wolves to succumb to the same threats that nearly drove them to extinction in generations past. Oregon’s wolves must be granted endangered species protection once more to maintain a healthy ecosystem for all wildlife in the Cascades region.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Governor Brown,

The 2015 decision to delist wolves from Oregon’s endangered species list has had deadly consequences for these animals. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has time and again given in to demands from ranchers to kill wolves, even though scientific research has proven that these methods are ineffective at protecting livestock. Without protection, the wolf population may soon drop well below the 2015 levels.

Wolves are needed for a healthy and stable ecosystem in Oregon. Without them, many other species will suffer. We demand that you call for the restoration of their protected status as an endangered species within the state, and put an immediate end to the pack cullings.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

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5 Comments

  1. start protecting these beautiful animals before they become extinct

  2. You’ll never be able to protect these animals until the greatest threat to their existence is extinguished–human stupidity. And since we seem to glorify and reward stupidity in our society, it may be better to let the wolves go extinct. At least they won’t have to suffer at our hands anymore.

  3. OREGON EARTH NEEDS THE WILDLIFE NOW.

  4. Rosslyn Osborne says:

    Until the ‘departments’ stop taking orders/bribes from the cattle grazing folk who are allowing their cattle to graze on the Public Lands, and encouraging the unsuspecting cattle to lick blocks strategically placed near breeding dens of wolves… this will never stop. Naturally the cattle will destroy all the native flora, and foul the water thus driving away the wolves natural foods, so then they have no choice but to prey upon the calves.
    Naturally the wolves pay the ultimate price!
    Cattle should never be allowed off the property and all fences must be dog proof.

  5. Back off and leave the wolves alone! OR ELSE!!!!

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